Lessons Learned from Diana Wynne Jones: Real Problems in Unreal Books

ouaewdgwi4qnmfm3vtinifcbjcvdom1ej8ik8vsxfmfcfapfacq9ap3n28almo5xerxobltvefcl3rncfs2hao9m3jhmis9ni8mrtuie2kwc8uwbvg8cj8qrmmtlhjIn Reflections on the Magic of Writing, Diana Wynne Jones notes more than once that she received flak for not writing “Real Books.” Real Books were to be about present-day, everyday-world children handling real, everyday problems: abusive parents, poverty, illness, etc. These books should then be passed on to kids actually experiencing said problems to…I don’t know, strengthen character or something. She didn’t get it either, which is why you don’t see any Real Books with Jones’ name on them. (Personally I like her recollection of fellow writer Jill Paton Walsh’s words on the matter: “If you know two people who are divorcing, would you give them each a copy of Anna Karenina? Can you imagine a less helpful book? Yet people do this to children all the time.”)

What I do love is Jones’ own style of handling Real Problems in Unreal Ways. Take Witch Week, or Year of the Griffin—who doesn’t experience some lousy spells (couldn’t resist, sorry) in school? It doesn’t matter that one of the main characters in Year is a griffin: she’s a still a new student trying to find her way through a school with horrible teachers. Eight Days of Luke, Black Maria, and Fire and Hemlock all have terrible adult guardians the child protagonist has to survive; some are mean, some are self-centered, and some are, well, magical.

Now granted, I haven’t completed my journey through all of Jones’ work, but I did just finish The Ogre Downstairs. As I read the final pages, it occurred to me that this was the first book where magic was part of the problem, but not the solution. It’s a story of a mixed family created by a widow marrying a divorced man the widow’s children nickname The Ogre. The Ogre’s two sons are just as beastly at the outset. When The Ogre gives each group of children a unique chemical set (enter the magic!), everything gets profoundly worse with The Ogre, but better among the children. Why? Because they work together to figure out how to stop floating, or how to get their minds re-switched to their proper bodies. Magic forces them to see things from each other’s perspective, and from this they unite against The Ogre. Magic completely destroys a party the widow wanted so badly to succeed, and the row afterwards drives the widow out of the house for space. Everyone feels terrible, including The Ogre, who is not, the children realize, an ogre at all. The story ends with a family that better understands each other and, thanks to a final round with the magical chemistry sets, enough money to live in a new house sans magic toffee creatures or living dust balls. So yes, I suppose the magic did help with a solution in the way end, but the primary conflict was not solved by magic, but by understanding and teamwork.

A Real Book kind of solution to a Real Book kind of problem in an Unreal Book. Fancy that.

Click here for more information on Diana Wynne Jones.

Click here for more information on Diana Wynne Jones’ REFLECTIONS ON THE MAGIC OF WRITING.

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2 thoughts on “Lessons Learned from Diana Wynne Jones: Real Problems in Unreal Books

  1. Thank you for the first Fantasy apologetic which has caused a reevaluation of my predisposition to realism, or rather the pretense of realism. Perhaps it’s why Jesus spoke in parables, why Hamlet produced a dumbshow and why we say “I have a friend…” We need the spoonful of sugar – or potion – to make the medicine go down.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Precisely. Adults and children alike often have an extremely difficult time analyzing their own behaviors or situations. We need the distance that spoonful of potion (nice touch) provides for the sake of objectivity, if nothing else.

    Like

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